Obviously the clip above contains major spoilers. If you have been following The Jinx but haven't yet watched its final episode, go do that before reading this or anything else on the internet. If you haven't been following The Jinx and haven't yet watched its final episode, reevaluate your life, and then go watch it all before reading this or anything else on the internet.

That said: wow. Director Andrew Jarecki's skill as a reporter/documentarian and luck as a human being aligned to give The Jinx the most satisfying ending possible. Earlier today, we learned that Durst had been arrested for first degree murder Saturday night—new evidence presented in The Jinx led the LAPD to reopen the investigation into the 2000 murder of Durst confidante Susan Berman.

And then, in The Jinx's final moments, Durst seemingly confessed to all three murders he's been accused of—Berman's, his wife Kathie Durst's, and, his "best friend" whom he admitted to dismembering but claimed he killed in self defense in 2001.

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Much of the finale focused on the chore of getting Durst to sit down for a followup interview he'd previously agreed to do. The Jinx became A Documentary About The Jinx (things get intricate when you have a figure as slippery, seemingly sociopathic, and flat-out bizarre as Durst). He finally agreed to meet one last time, and during that interview Jarecki presented Durst with the most damning evidence yet: an envelope that held a note addressed to Berman from Durst, and one that had been sent to the Beverly Hills Police Department following Berman's murder (the letter inside notified them of a "cadaver" at her address). Both envelopes were written in nearly identical block letters, both misspelled Beverly as "Beverley."

Durst admitted to writing the letter and envelope to Berman, but said that he did not send the letter to the police department. Jarecki showed him a side-by-side comparison of the two "BEVERLEY"s, and asked Durst if he could point out which one he didn't write. Durst could not say.

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(He also burped loudly when confronted by the similarity of the "BEVERLEY"s—which was a new tic frontier for Durst. That burp was guilty as hell.)

Then, after the interview, when Durst's mic was still clipped to him and not yet turned off, he went to the bathroom and talked to himself about what had just happened. Here is a transcript of what he said:

There it is. You're caught. You're right, of course. But you can't imagine. Arrest him. I don't know what's in the house. Oh, I want this. What a disaster. He was right. I was wrong. And the burping. I'm having difficulty with the question. What the hell did I do? Killed them all, of course.

You may recall Durst gave a similar seeming admission of guilt via hot mic at the end of Episode 4. This guy never learned—he thought he could get away with anything, because he had. It looks like Durst's luck has finally run out, and it's all thanks to The Jinx.